B2 - STAFF B2 - RESEARCH B2 - PUBLICATIONS
     
  
  
        
 

The aim of the project B2, Modeling the flow behavior of blood cells and von Willebrand factor in primary hemostasis, is to better understand the primary hemostasis process with the intricate interplay of VWF, platelets and other blood cells in flow on the basis of mesoscale blood-flow simulations. The formation of an initial clot is affected by various blood flow conditions including flow rate, hematocrit (volume fraction of red blood cells), and aggregation between red blood cells (RBCs). In addition, the distribution of VWF and platelets within a vessel cross-section plays an important role, since both VWF and platelets need to be in close proximity to a vessel wall in order to adhere. The migration (or margination) of VWF and platelets toward vessel walls in blood flow is mediated by RBCs, and needs to occur prior to the adhesion of platelets and VWF to a wall. Thus, we will investigate computationally the margination and adhesion of VWF and platelets to a wall and to each other in blood flow. This process will lead to the formation of thrombus-like aggregates and to initial blood clotting. In particular, the dependence of clot formation on adhesion interactions, VWF properties, and flow characteristics will be studied, where the differences in adhesion interactions may correspond to certain mutations of VWF, with implications for the von Willebrand disease. Blood clotting will be investigated using a three-component mixture of VWF, platelets and RBCs for different flow conditions. Our investigations will be based on a mesoscale hydrodynamics simulation technique smoothed dissipative particles dynamics and a mechano-elastic model of cells, platelets and VWF, which have been shown previously to properly model blood flow and the behavior of soft objects (e.g., polymers, vesicles, red blood cells) under flow.

 
     
   
     
   Figure: Sketch of the primary hemostatic process. RBCs are shown in red, platelets in blue, and the VWF in green. Platelets and VWF can bind to a wall in blood flow, while platelets are able to bind also to a stretched VWF.   
  
  
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B2 - STAFF B2 - RESEARCH B2 - PUBLICATIONS